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Here is an amazing poem by the Buddhist priest Myลe (ๆ˜Žๆต) (1173โ€“1232)

ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚„ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚„ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚„ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚„ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚ใ‹ใ‚„ๆœˆ

He has been called the "poet of the moon". The translation is

โ€œBright, bright, and bright, bright, bright, and bright, bright.
Bright and bright, bright, and bright, bright moon.โ€

What I found quite amazing is that this poem is a tanka: it follows the 5-7-5-7-7 pattern.

aka aka ya
aka aka aka ya
aka aka ya
aka aka aka ya
aka aka ya tsuki

ยท ยท Web ยท 4 ยท 10 ยท 16

If you are a student of Japanese, then you might want to read the whole essay from which the poem was taken, it is very interesting:

็พŽใ—ใ„ๆ—ฅๆœฌใฎ็ง by ๅท็ซฏๅบทๆˆ

quickandtastycooking.org.uk/ka

@Zerofactorial It is, isn't it? On one level it is almost nonsense but on another level it's genius.

@wim_v12e I imagine it as a kind of chant out in the midst of nature

@Zerofactorial The poet wrote an note explaining that he was meditating in winter in a hall on the top of a mountain, and when he left the meditation hall, walking through the snow, he saw this very bright moon.

@wim_v12e for a good while i was thinking lowly of poetry and Buddhism intersection as they are unlikely to show wound up, cathartic or other extremities of life. At lease now i know that they don't need that to be crazy (uh, oh) beautiful!

@polezaivsani I think I see what you mean, because those Buddhist monks led very different lives from us. And often a lot of context is needed to interpret their poems. Without that they may seem very abstract and remote.

@Eidon Yes indeed, it is one of the poems that Kawabata discusses in his Nobel lecture. I think said so in the other posts in the thread.

I am assuming very few people here will actually ever read that lecture, or my article, so I wanted to share a little bit of it.

@wim_v12e Thank you very much for the wonders you share!!

Some days pass without me checking timelines -- it's something bad, I'm sorry. Then I go through yours, and it's always one gem after another. Not only your excellent toots; also the ones that you forward are often extremely interesting ๐Ÿ™‡

@Eidon I think that is quite a good thing, that you are not constantly checking the timeline.
You flatter me ๐Ÿ˜Š but thank you very much!

@wim_v12e I have still not read it, my apologies. But I really want to -- the topic is simply too interesting to me!

In my opinion it is an excellent idea to post gems taken from other gems. There is indeed a greater chance that someone may benefit from them... In some cases, I even go for full reposts, as you know! Some people I know do this regularly and I would say very heavily -- that is too much imo...

@Eidon I think I will do a few more. Not everything is a good fit for a blog post, sometimes a fedi post is just the right format.

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