@kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek @cwebber

This is something I have to reflect upon.

I'm under the impression that commercial exploitation destroys anything good that comes from hacking.

Linux included.

At times, I'd like a license stricter then AGPL for my code, just to protect it from "the market".

And I refuse to accept that being commercial is the only way to be useful to people. That's the ethics of Capitalism, and I don't like it.

@Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker @rysiek I'm skeptical of and concerned about commercial exploitation too. Problem is, "noncommercial" doesn't fix the things you'll expect it to, and will prevent things you want.

Here's a question: if Linux were noncommercial, should a community run nonprofit be legally allowed to run it in a commercially run hosting service / datacenter? Even if the hosting service profits from it? Can the cooperative collect dues?

@cwebber @Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker here's another question: if I support Gargamel on Patreon, does mastodon/social suddenly become a commercial instance? Does that mean he cannot use NC emojos here?

@rysiek @cwebber @Shamar @kaniini @starbreaker NC licensing is a problem for exactly this reason... it's a shaky legal foundation and it also doesn't port well internationally.

CC's interpretation of NC is purposefully vague to be flexible: wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/

In my opinion, that doesn't make it very useful; NC is mostly a barrier to combining with other FOSS licenses, especially the big copyleft licenses.

In some cases, artists and musicians feel more comfortable with CC licensing... 1/2

@diggity @rysiek @cwebber @Shamar @starbreaker

For another weirdness, the BY (attribution) part of CC licences are vague too, which has caused problems for #OpenStreetMap users who want to use CC-BY-SA data blog.openstreetmap.org/2017/03

@ebel @rysiek @cwebber @Shamar @starbreaker interesting... attribution can be difficult for artistic works too, e.g. combining CC graphics from multiple sources for print works or merchandise (where do you put attribution on a one inch button?).

OSM should probably also ask the contributor to license any of their original work under ODbL when they submit; dual licenses would probably make life easier in the long run, but also new versions of CC licenses can address this compatibility directly.

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@diggity @ebel @rysiek @Shamar @starbreaker I do agree that attribution can be hard to accommodate on large collaborative projects

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