Christopher Lemmer Webber is a user on octodon.social. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse. If you don't, you can sign up here.

We have web-based chat options, from Slack to the good ones like #RocketChat and #Mattermost.

But they take up a lot of resources, as they scale. Compared to dedicated servers and protocols, such as #IRC and #XMPP, you end up throwing a lot of resources per user.

This makes me think that the web-based ones work for teams (as a shared space for ambient documentation and file sharing), but not as a public service.

Of course #jabber exceeds at scale due to federation. Like email.

I can't quite put my finger on it, but something about the UI/paradigm of web-based #IRC is really compelling.

A friend here once told me in person that Slack was just a UI shift, and IRC could be improved by copying that (my paraphrase, it was obviously more elegant than that).

If that were the case, we are really talking about the client. Because IRC is weird, and the more we can hide it, the sooner people can do boring business things.

Slack, et al, make boring business easy. 🤔

Christopher Lemmer Webber @cwebber

@maiki I think this person was me... I think what I was saying was "it turns out that Slack mostly showed that nerds had the right design with IRC and XMPP MUC (which, while less popular, can do the things Slack can do that IRC can't) right all along, but what we didn't do was make it accessible to the general public, which is what Slack managed to do really well."

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See folks, @cwebber was able to say it more elegantly than I!

In my defense, when Chris told me this, e had just stuffed me full of free Stripe (payment processor) food, so I probably wasn't listening well. ^_^

@cwebber @maiki
It all boils down to usability. Irc is horrible for new users with steep learning curve and little to no benefit - social media do more and better

@mdfrg I think it is usability *and* technical debt. There's no way to count private IRC servers, of course, but they don't show up in my industries.

If there was an easy-to-install IRC server for folks that do desktop support (generalized, drawing an arbitrary line around the tech support a given office work receives), I'd be looking at improving IRC clients.

I think web-based chat servers are easier to setup and maintain. I think. ^_^

@maiki
For sure they are more 'natural' to use for users. Also, there is a lack of modern and easy to use clients for irc