I only just read this and it's blowing my mind:

josephg.com/blog/3-tribes/

I understand my rage and advocacy so much better now that I've placed myself on the code poet–hacker–maker simplex.

I have many thoughts.

§ The code poets are the vegan artists of the bunch ("your shit art don't pay, music eats ramen" per , herself a poet). Gentle shoulda included "grad school, university" in their hangouts. But they CAN make 💰💰💰 at Galois, Jane Street, and a few other boutique firms.

(Obligatory viewing for the cultured: 's opus, "NYC Bitche$" youtube.com/watch?v=0-taYShNaP)

§ The hacker bros & ladies! "You have too many hipsters, hire some fat guys who know C++" via medriscoll.com/post/9117396231 Forget games, these mufuckers make a ton of bank in defense, security, and finance. Many of them, in fits of absentmindedness in college, took several math classes—these are very valuable and can be found in physics places like CERN. They can make us FPGA/GPU accelerators.

(I married a hacker lady. Ask me anything 😂.)

§ Ahh, my makers, my beloved family. I may have wandered the lands of Clojure transducers and Haskell applicatives, and once upon a time paid the bills squeezing cache misses and branch mispredictions out of hot loops, but those days are over, the prodigal son has returned.

We make things for ourselves, our friends, our adoring (& paying!) users, so we developed a tolerance for dumb languages with trash runtimes like JavaScript and Python—worth it!

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But, my maker brothers and sisters, have you noticed? Those barbarians, the poets and the hackers, send us their choicest wares as tribute!

Elm, PureScript, TypeScript, BuckleScript (OCaml), Fable (F#) all seek glory by serving us.

We made so much money, we paid hackers to make V8 and SpiderMonkey and JavaScriptCore the most advanced VMs in the world.

We raided the hackerlands and brought back precious crypto to make Secure ScuttleButt, Dat, IPFS, BitTorrent. Soon all will be JavaScript!

But alas, like the social scientists with physics envy, we envy the poets and the hackers for some reason. We sometimes want to be like them even as we are glad we aren't.

We chain our young to desks in university CS programs to "learn" poetry and hacking by rote! We shame them in interviews if they can't reverse a binary tree or have never malloc'ed without free'ing in their lives!

This is most shameful. Why should we mimic them? Let us apprentice young makers and make things together!

I’ve invoked Gentle’s article “3 tribes of programming” josephg.com/blog/3-tribes/ several times since reading it recently and placing myself and my friends on the poet–hacker–maker simplex.

For example, the popular post “Why Go and not Rust?” simply inspired awareness that Go is a bona fide maker language while Rust is an alchemy experiment 🧫🧪 making a deeply poetic language for hackers and makers alike.

Similarly I’m a maker & dgaf about , , , etc. I recognize others might but 🤷‍♀️🤷‍♂️.

Rms grossness 

@22 Agreed. I'm sure someone needs to know how to create a binary tree. I've been making software for 25 years. Binary trees always were part of the programming ecosystem: I only need how to use them. And I'm sure that that is true for the majority of software developers.

@22 Yes. Exactly. And I sense the sarcasm in that statement. I've made software professionally for 20+ years. Some of it still is in use today. I don't need to be able to recreate a heap. The language should have the heap algorithm in it. The language creator or ecosystem developers need to know the algorithm. I just need to know how it works and when to apply it.

@lordbowlich Don't shout that off the roof tops, though. Let it be our secret, and the rest of the Fediverse.

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