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video lessons review workflow:

- watch recorded video in VLC, transcribe sentences with , filling skipped particles, & omitting conversational suffixes. VLC: ⌘⌃← skips 3 seconds and ⌘⌥← 10 seconds.

- Use (github.com/fasiha/curtiz-japan) to create readings.

- Check readings.

- Add translations.

- Use text-to-speech (works best with kanji).

- Check audio.

- Bulk-import CSV into .

- Use (github.com/fasiha/memrise-driv) to upload audio to Memrise.

- 🥳

(I have a Bash script for AWS Polly, which is so tiny it fits in a toot with usage comments:

# USAGE:
# $ cat text | ./makeAudio.sh
# or
# $ cat text | ./makeAudio.sh <voice, defaults to Takumi>

while read line; do
echo $line

aws polly synthesize-speech --output-format mp3 --voice-id ${1:-Takumi} --text "$line" "$line.mp3"

sleep 0.1
done

I generate audio with *both* Takumi and Mizuki voices. The WebDriver script looks for audio files in this format in specific directories. Results 💯!)

Cannot emphasize how effective such review is. Regularly reviewing your teacher's turns of phrases, colocations, particle usage, plain vocabulary, with nice audio, in colorful Memrise, lets us squeeze so much more juice out of video chats with teacher.

If this is too crypto-fascist technocrat, I'd still suggest recording your teaching sessions and converting them to flashcards.

I'd also emphasize the magic isn't the tech. Triple-check the kanji and particles, otherwise it's 🧠🔫.

(And yes, I'm writing a replacement for Memrise for Japanese practice that uses fasiha.github.io/ebisu, my review planner that is more ergonomic than Memrise's for adults, MeCab/J.DepP for automatic morphological parsing and bunsetsu chunking, auto-generation of fill-in-the-blank quizzes for particles and conjugated phrases (verb/adjective phrases), and is a local-first app with bring-your-own-storage, with no server dependencies.

But Memrise is the 80% Pareto solution. Use it.)

By the way. The kids and the adults use the same Memrise course.

Hint: grade schoolers get addicted to Memrise gamification and competing with parents for review points.

"I want to use your laptop to do my daily Memrise."
"Can you use my phone?"
"No, the phone only gives me 50 points per review and the laptop gives me 150."
"⁇"
<experiment>
"Oh, looks like they both give the same points, but I still want to use your laptop, I might get more points on it."

💜

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